Professor Sir. Graham Teasdale | 

Honorary Professor of Neurosurgery & Co-inventor of the Glasgow Coma Scale

 

 

 

 

Professor Sir Graham Teasdale was Professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Glasgow from 1981 and along with Professor Bryan Jennett invented the Glasgow Coma Scale, which is now used in hospitals all over the world to assess the severity of brain injuries. 

In addition to having over 300 peer reviewed publications Sir Graham has been appointed to many governing positions as well as received numerous awards from around the world.

Sir Graham was President of the Society of British Neurological Surgeons between 2000 and 2002, President of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow between 2003 and 2006 and was made Knight Batchelor in 2006 for services to Neurosurgery and victims of head injuries. He is also a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and has received the Distinguished Service Award of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Medal of Honour of the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies.

Professor John Pickard | 

Professor of Neurosurgery

Addenbrookes Hospital,

Cambridge 

 

 

Professor Pickard is Professor (Emeritus) of Neurosurgery in the Department of Clinical Neurosciences of the University of Cambridge. He was the previous chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Cambridge before his retirement in 2013. His research has focused on advancing the care of patients with acute brain injury, hydrocephalus and prolonged disorders of consciousness through functional brain imaging, studies of pathophysiology and clinical trials of new treatments including health economic and ethical aspects. He is the honorary director of the National Institute for Health Research’s Healthcare Technology Cooperative (HTC) for brain injury. He has championed the growth of the HTC portfolio by working with patients and their carers to identify unmet needs in the brain injury pathway, catalyzing NHS pull by targeting industry engagement, and building collaborations that utilize expert networks and world leading clinical communities.

Professor Robert Martuza | 

Professor & Chief of Neurosurgery

Harvard Medical School,

Neurosurgeon-in-Chief

Massachusetts General Hospital,

USA

 

 

Professor Robert L. Martuza, M.D. has been Chief of Neurosurgery Service for Massachusetts General Hospital and Higgins Professor of Neurosurgery at Harvard Medical School since 2000. Professor Martuza served as a Member of the Scientific Advisory Council of MediGene AG, served as a Director of ImmunoCellular Therapeutics, Ltd. from December 1, 2006 to February 22, 2011. Since 1980, Professor Martuza has been a Director of the Pappas Center for Neuro-Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital and on the Board of Trustees for the Massachusetts General Physicians Organization, Inc. He serves as a Director of the American Board of Neurological Surgery; serves on the Board of Scientific Counselors at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; and is coordinating reviewer and serves on the Program Committee for the American Society of Gene Therapy. In addition Professor Martuza is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and has won numerous awards including the Physician’s Recognition Award from the American Medical Association. He plays a leading role in the clinical development of oncolytic Herpes Simplex technology and is the author of numerous scientific publications. He is a recognized authority on neurosurgery. He has published numerous articles and books in the field of neurology and has 11 patents issued or pending involving cell therapy. Professor Martuza has received many grants for research with major research interests in central nervous system tumors, neurofibromatosis, cancer therapy with viral vectors and molecular neurosurgery. Professor Martuza holds a B.A. degree from Bucknell University and a M.D. from Harvard Medical School. He was a post-doctoral fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Professor Henry Brem | 

Director  of Neurosurgery

The Harvey Cushing Professor of Neurosurgery,

Neurosurgeon-in-Chief

Johns Hopkins Hospital,

Baltimore,

USA

 

 

Henry Brem is the Harvey Cushing Professor of Neurosurgery at The Johns Hopkins University, Director of the Department of Neurosurgery, and Neurosurgeon-in-Chief. He also is a professor of Oncology, Ophthalmology, and Biomedical Engineering.

Henry Brem has developed new tools and techniques that have changed the field of neurosurgery. Professor Brem carried out the pivotal clinical study that introduced navigational imaging into the neurosurgical suite. His work led to the FDA's approval of the first image guidance computer system for intra-operative localization of tumours. Furthermore, he has changed the surgical armamentarium against brain tumors by inventing and developing Gliadel® wafers to intra-operatively deliver chemotherapy to brain tumors. His work has shown that surgeons can accurately deliver potent therapies directly at the tumour site. Professor Brem received his undergraduate degree from New York University, his medical degree from Harvard, and trained in neurosurgery at Columbia. At Hopkins, he has built one of the largest brain tumour research and treatment centers in the world. He reinstituted the Hunterian Neurosurgery Laboratory (originally founded by Cushing) and has trained numerous researchers who have revolutionized the fields of intra-operative imaging, angiogenesis, immunotherapy, and controlled release polymers for drug delivery to the brain. Professor Brem has changed the surgical treatment of brain tumors by introducing new approaches for targeted therapy. He developed new classes of polymers and microchips for drug delivery that are custom synthesized for the agent being developed. The polyanhydrides, which were the first new treatments for brain tumors that the FDA had approved in 23 years, have been shown in his laboratory to be biocompatible and potent. He then designed and led the clinical trials demonstrating safety and efficacy. Professor Brem has used his laboratory experience to design and lead many novel multi-institutional clinical trials to prove the safety and efficacy of this approach in patients with brain tumors. His work has been continuously funded by the NIH since 1982, and is currently funded by several active grants. Professor Brem's teaching was recognized by the Hopkins Professors Award for Excellence in Teaching in 1996. In 1998 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. In 2000 he was awarded the Grass Award by the Society of Neurological Surgeons for meritorious research; in 2001 he received the Founders Award of the Controlled Release Society; in 2004 he received the New York University Distinguished Alumni Award; in 2005 he was co-recipient of the Society for Biomaterials Technology Innovation and Development Award and was named the Coleman Fellow in Life Sciences at Ben-Gurion University. In 2011 he delivered the commencement address for the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He has been recognized by the Castle Connolly Guide each year from 2002 in “America’s Top Doctors”, and from 2005 – present in “America’s Top Doctors for Cancer”. In 2013, the Society for NeuroOncology and the Section on Tumors of the AANS/CNS named him as the recipient of the Abhijit Guha Award. In 2014, The Johns Hopkins University established the Henry Brem Endowed Chair in Neurosurgery. To sustain his vision of combining scientific progress with improved clinical outcomes, philanthropy is important to Professor Brem. He has raised over $75 million to establish a Neurosurgery Pain Research Institute at Johns Hopkins. During his chairmanship, the Department of Neurosurgery has raised over $160 million, including nine endowed chairs to support, sustain and stabilize the department’s spirit of innovation and excellence.

 

In summary, over the past 30 years, Henry Brem has introduced new therapeutic approaches to Neurosurgery. His devotion to patient care, clinical excellence and translational science has brought together a unique group of neurosurgeons and investigators that have changed the field of neurosurgery. His approach to science and medicine has also had significant impact throughout Johns Hopkins. His trainees have gone on to distinguished careers in science and medicine and are serving in leadership roles throughout the world. He continues his practice of complex brain surgery and to lead the Johns Hopkins Neurosurgery Department.

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Professor Alim Benabid | 

Professor of Biophysics & Neurosurgery

Pioneer of Deep Brain Stimulation

Joseph Fourier University,

France

 

 

Professor Benabid obtained his medical degree in 1970 and his Ph.D. in Physics in 1978. and had a sabbatical fellowship in the laboratory of Preclinical Neuropharmacology of Floyd Bloom, at the Salk Institute La Jolla California from 1979 to 1980. Alim Louis Benabid was appointed Professor at Grenoble University, in Neurosurgery and Experimental Medicine in 1978 until 1983, then in Neurosurgery and Biophysics.

 

From 1988 to 2007, he was the Director of the research laboratory INSERM unit 318, entitled Preclinical Neurosciences, and from 1989 to 2007, Head of the Neurosurgery Department at the University Hospital of Grenoble, Professor of Biophysics at Joseph Fourier University. Alim Louis Benabid was also Coordinator of the Claudio Munari Center for Surgery of Epilepsy and Movement Disorders, at Hospital Ni Guardia in Milan, Italy since 1998 to 2002. He was also Staff consultant at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio since 2000 to 2002. 

 

Professor Benabid has centred his scientific activity on the approach of neurosurgical pathologies, particularly brain tumours and movement disorders, namely Parkinson's disease. He developed in his hospital robotic stereotactic surgery which permits biopsies and therapeutics acts, aimed at functional targets. Activities of Alim Louis Benabid can be described under three themes: Neurosurgical robotics and brain imaging: in order to obtain a precise stereotactic tool, interventional robots have been designed. Experimental therapeutics in neuro-oncology: Alim Louis Benabid has developed surgical methods, particularly stereotactic, including application of robotics to approach functionally eloquent zones, implantation of radioactive isotopes, and particularly stereotactic biopsies of brain tumors for diagnostic and research purposes. From these biopsy samples, a brain tumor tissue bank has been elaborated. On the material of this Brain Tumour Bank, research on molecular biology is being conducted in his research unit. The occurrence of abnormal involuntary movements during the long-term dopaminergic treatment of Parkinsonian patients has required the return of functional neurosurgery. In order to diminish side effects Alim Louis Benabid has designed a new method of stereotactic inhibition of surgical targets, initially limited to the thalamus and to the pallidum. The discovery in 1987 of the effects mimicking the lesion induced by electrical stimulation at high frequency has allowed a rebirth of this surgery and new therapeutic possibilities. The remarkable efficacy of this treatment, associated to its very low morbidity, has permitted to apply it to other targets, (particularly the subthalamic nucleus, and to diminish the medical treatments), as well as to other indications, notably mental disorders. 

 

Currently his activity is oriented toward the understanding of mechanisms of action of deep brain stimulation at high frequency, the precise identification of the efficient targets and of the neuronal networks which are involved, as well as of possible long-term effects, particularly neuroprotective, which could be due to the long-term effects of the stimulation on the natural history of Parkinson's disease. Since 2007, he has joined the French Commission of Atomic Energy as a Scientific Adviser and is Chairman of the Board of the new Clinatec Institute which ne initiated and which is devoted to the application of nanotechnologies to Neurosciences Alim Louis Benabid is a member of the Institut Universitaire de France, of the French Academy of Sciences, of the French Academy of Medicine and of the Royal Academy of Medicine of Belgium, and he received a Doctorate Honoris Causa from the University of Galway, Ireland, from the University of London, Ontario, Canada, and from McGill University, Montreal Quebec, and of Porto, Portugal.

Professor George Jallo | 

Director of Paediatric Neurosurgery,

Johns Hopkins Hospital,

USA

 

 

George Jallo graduated from the University of Virginia School of Medicine in 1991. It was his experience with Dr. John Jane that stimulated his interest in Neurosurgery. He completed both his residency training (New York University Medical Center-Bellevue, 1998) and pediatric fellowship training under the mentorship of Fred J Epstein at the Institute for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Medical Center, 1999. In 2003, Dr. Jallo was recruited to Johns Hopkins University, to further develop his clinical and research interests. Dr. Jalloʼs clinical interests are minimally invasive neurosurgery (keyhole craniotomy and endoscopy) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors in both pediatric and adult patients. His other clinical interest is pediatric epilepsy. This has resulted in numerous publications in the neurosurgical literature. His laboratory research focus is the development of new therapies for brainstem and spinal cord tumors. His laboratory developed one of the first animal models for these rare conditions, and the application of novel local delivery molecules to treat these tumors. Professor Jallo is also director of the neurosurgery residency program.

Professor Henry Marsh CBE | 

Professor of Neurosurgery

St.Georges Hospital,

London 

 

 

Henry Marsh was the senior consultant neurosurgeon at the Atkinson Morley Unit at St.Georgeʼs Hospital, London before his retirement in 2015. Professor Marsh specialises in awake craniotomies and was the subject of a major BBC documentary Your Life in Their Hands in 2004, which won the Royal Television Society Gold Medal. He has been working with neurosurgeons in the former Soviet Union, mainly in Ukraine, since 1992 and his work there was the subject of the award-winning BBC Storyville film The English Surgeon. Marsh was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2010 Birthday Honours. Professor Marsh is also the director of research and a founder of the International Neurosurgical Centre, Ukraine.

Professor Tipu Aziz | 

Professor of Neurosurgery

Founder & Head of Oxford Functional Neurosurgery, 

John Radcliffe Hospital,

Oxford

 

 

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Mr. Jay Jayamohan | 

Senior Consultant Paediatric Neurosurgeon

John Radcliffe Hospital,

Oxford

 

 

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Miss Helen Fernandes | 

Consultant Neurosurgeon

Addenbrookes Hospital, 

Cambridge 

 

Being updated...

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Mr Calan Mathieson | 

Consultant Neurosurgeon

Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, 

Glasgow

 

 

Mr Roddy O'Kane | 

Consultant Neurosurgeon

Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, 

Glasgow

 

 

Being updated...

Miss Jennifer Brown | 

Consultant Neurosurgeon

Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, 

Glasgow

 

 

Mr George Samandouras | 

Co-Director of the Victor Horsley Department of Neurosurgery

The National Hospital for Neurology & Neurosurgery, 

Queens Square,

London 

 

 

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Allan Hall | 

Founder

 

After attending Glasgow for my undergraduate medical degree, including an intercalated degree in clinical neuroscience, I undertook my foundation training which included rotations in neurosurgery, A&E, general surgery and medicine including neurology and stroke.

I set up Glasgow Neuro back in 2010 to help promote the neuro specialty and over the past 5 years have built up the society from a local, medical school society to a now well established society that holds  both national and international events. The society also has the world's leading neurosurgeons as honorary patrons from institutions around the world including Harvard, John's Hopkins, Oxford, Cambridge and France.

I am also a member of the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies Young Neurosurgeons Committee.

I have undertaken research within several areas of neuroscience and have published my work within international journals. I am currently undertaking my masters degree in addition to my work as a MBChB examiner and demonstrator in clinical anatomy.

Once I complete my training I would like to specialise in both adult and paediatric neurosurgery.

© 2018 Glasgow Neuro Society.